Book lists for software engineers and architects

I came across this excellent article recently and while the target audience is Software Architects, in my view this is a great book list for anyone who is looking to grow their software engineering skills in general. I often talk to software engineers about reading books as part of their professional development plan (I’ll over this is in a post soon).

What I really like about this list is that it is actually planned with an approach of building on previous books. So you don’t have to follow this exact list, but what you might think about is the importance/value of having a planned set of books/references to build upon rather than just have a random set of books to read.“

I particularly like the approach of introducing the DDD books later in the path.The foundational aspects of the initial books sets up DDD really well.

https://haitham-raik.medium.com/books-for-great-software-architect-34c81fc70e12

Awesome TED talk on happiness

I’d classify/tag this as off-topic but the reality over the quarter of a century in my professional life in IT, I’ve worked out one thing – you are working/coding better when you are happy. This is about the best video I’ve come across on the subject. I actually found it on c-sharpcorner.com for the record.

 

Great article on writing clean C# code

This is just gold. For any newbie touching C# please read this document – covers some really simple yet very important guidelines:

http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/article/tips-for-writing-clean-and-best-code-in-c-sharp/

 

Scholarship – Women in Tech @ General Assembly in Melbourne – CLOSES MONDAY 12 September

I really wish I had seen this earlier – only 3 days to get an application in for any women interested in this rare opportunity:

https://generalassemb.ly/apply/wdi-scholarship-application-melbourne

 

My presentation at University Canberra, 1 September

I am presenting a session on Career development for software engineers on Рso for any UC students interested in some advice on career planing come along. Similar to one I ran a month ago at ANU.

 

 

how to be a successful software engineer

I’ve been blogging about this for a while and I guess eventually when you are in this subject area you will come across a great article. This is one of them. Don’t get me wrong there are a lot of good articles on “How to be a successful Software Engineer”. This article is special, very special:

http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/article/how-to-be-a-successful-software-engineer/

Nice and simple and well structured and focussed on the type of things that I have seen great engineers focus on in their career. This is a gem of an article for young and not so-young aspiring developers.

More advice for University Students (newbie coders)

 

Another older but great article focussing on advice for young developers:

http://blog.codinghorror.com/learning-on-the-battlefield/

Here’s the key advice for students about to embark on a career in Software Engineering:

  • If you’re a student, seek out internships like your life depends on it. Some of the best programmers I’ve ever met have been college interns. Intern somewhere that you can absorb and learn as much as possible. You won’t make much money, but the experience will be priceless. ¬†
  • Participate in local user groups. User groups are an unbeatable resource for people just starting out in their careers; they’re an excellent source of advice and mentorship.
  • Contribute to an open-source project. There are thousands, so pick whatever strikes your fancy. But pick one and really dig in, become an active contributor. Absolutely nothing is more practical than working collaboratively with software developers all over the globe, from all walks of life.
  • Publish articles. The cleverest code in the world won’t help you if you can’t clearly communicate how that code works, or what it’s for. Try your hand at writing.CodeProject is an excellent sandbox to practice in. Publish an article and the large, active CodeProject community will let you know how you’re doing with ratings and comments. ¬†
  • Start a blog. Pick a writing schedule and stick with it; I recommend once a week at minimum. Select a general theme for your blog and write on topics related (at least tangentially) to that theme. And don’t be an echo chamber.

Source: blog.codinghorror.com (2007)